Simple SWR and PWR Meter

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Many SWR / Power meter used by amateurs to the extent reasonably accurate continuous average power with a CW key-down signal, but can not reliably be used with other (modulated) signals PEP or average power measurement. These laws seek to show why the power measurement can be a sensitive issue, and because the interpretation of a yardstick of power can be a lot of attention and knowledge of construction and the characteristics of the instrument.

 A reflectometer-type SWR meter can be calibrated to give power back and forth (PF, Pr) on a power supply. A classic example is the 1943 Bird Series power meter, which is a directional coupler is used to obtain a sample voltage proportional to the voltage wave or forward or backward on the feeder (VF, VR). Other systems, perhaps more suitable for HF, then use a bridge circuit to perform the same function. The sample voltage is then rectified and displayed on a meter that is calibrated in watts. If the counter is typically a coil, the scale, so the numbers on the scale, representing the power, are proportional to the square of the applied voltage or the current calibration.

Circuit Diagram:

Simple SWR and PWR Meter

The theory of this type is very simple and is based on the concept represented by PF = Vf2/Zo. Note that if the power supply has an impedance that differs from the value of how the instrument is calibrated, there will be a mistake. The output voltage of the rectifier is a solid phase of VF or VR, and this is expected in the calibration of the meter. Examples of directional coupling, and bridge-type reflectometers are shown in Figures 1 and 2, while the bird directional coupler means 43 is illustrated in Figure 3. Note that in all cases the measurement circuit, a combination with a small RC time constant, making the system unsuitable for the measurement of PEP, and the absence of a specific device quadratic, making them unsuitable for measuring the average power .
 
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